Wednesday, February 13, 2008

My Margarita

Someone on my blogroll had recommended Bulgakov's "The Master and Margarita" to me. To that nameless blogger*, all I can say is: "thank you". It was a trip reading that brilliant book. But since my mind's just completely blown, I am going to have to read it again.

BTW, I read the most depressing piece of news about this book: Andrew Lloyd Webber plans to turn this masterpiece into a musical or an opera. Why, Lord, why?

(*I am guessing it was Alok. If so, thanks, Alok!)

7 comments:

Alok said...

Glad you liked it, I don't remember recommending it but there was a time not long back when I was asking everybody to read it, even offering to buy a copy :)

Russian pirates have copied the entire book on net, in two translations!! just in case you want to reread some specific chapter.

http://lib.ru/BULGAKOW/

Alok said...

the same site has his novella The Heart of a Dog too which is another hilarious headtrip.

lekhni said...

Yay! More ebooks! As if Project Gutenberg was not enough to spoil my (already failing) eyesight :(

Anonymous said...

These russians have some awesome OCR technology. Thanks for the link.

km said...

Alok: now I am sure it WAS you :)
Thanks for those links. I am going to read that novella over the weekend.

Lekhni: Staring at a screen to read anything longer than a blogpost is hard, isn't it?

Anon: Russians love their OCR too.

Rahul said...

Oddly enough, this is the second time today I'm reading about that book. The first time occurred as follows: I was listening to something that reminded me of the Stones' "Sympathy for the devil". So I listened to that. Then I looked up the wikipedia article on it, which said that the lyrics were heavily inspired by "The Master and Margarita", though apparently Jagger didn't say so.

As for Lloyd Webber -- Roger Waters said it well. (Lyrics, video)

km said...

Rahul: LOL@ that Waters' lyric. I had never heard that song before. Thanks for the links.

While I was aware of the lyrics to Sympathy being inspired by the book, I had somehow missed reading the book itself.

Man, '68 was a year for some really dark music.